News‎ > ‎

Prof. Salama gives 3 invited talks at ISEE 2017

posted Oct 31, 2017, 8:36 PM by Khaled salama   [ updated Nov 12, 2017, 12:12 AM ]
Prof. Salama will be giving a keynote talk at ISEE 2017 organized by Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam on November 29-30, 2017, in addition to two more invited talks.
  The aim of the conference is to provide a forum for regional and international researchers, educators, graduate students and engineers involved in the wide and multi-disciplinary areas of electrical and electronics engineering including microelectronics, communication systems, automation and control, and power and energy systems to disseminate their latest researches and share their innovative ideas.

 Talk 1- Keynote talk: Integrated Wireless Senors: A Hardware Perspective (Nov. 29, 10:30 - 11:30 AM)

Talk 2 - Invited talk: Future Computing Systems: Von Neuman and Beyond (Nov. 29,  3:25 - 3:50 PM)

Talk 3 - Invited talk: Energy-Efficient Interface Circuits for Low-Energy Sensor Nodes (Nov. 30, Morning)

Thắng Nguyễn reflects on work and life at KAUST


 Talk 1- Keynote talk: Integrated Wireless Senors: A Hardware Perspective (Nov. 29, 10:30 - 11:30 AM)

Networked systems of tiny wireless and sensing-enabled devices continue to give birth to a host of new applications that range from medical sensors for image-guided surgery, to distributed image-based surveillance of remote areas for security or environmental reasons. Such applications mandate new requirements in terms of size of the devices as well as the bandwidth required. Extreme requirements for small size packaging of the devices are obvious for many applications including biomedical ones. Fully integrated sensor modules that are capable of harvesting energy, sensing the environment and communicating with other sensors or base stations are becoming a necessity. Despite the development chips for these systems, there continues to be a need for improved implementations of micro-scale detection and processing systems for further convenience, scaling and portability. These systems would include a sensor module (mostly in mems), attached to analog front end circuitry, an analog to digital converter and a wireless communication module. We will present the research conducted at KAUST addressing many of these components. A flagship project demonstrating these concept is a single chip implantable wireless sensor system for Intraocular Pressure Monitoring (IOPM). This system-on-chip (SoC) is battery free and harvests energy from incoming RF signals, consumes 513 W of peak power and when implanted inside the eye, it can communicate over a distance of more than 15 cm.

Talk 2 - Invited talk: Future Computing Systems: Von Neuman and Beyond (Nov. 29,  3:25 - 3:50 PM)
Current CMOS-Based technologies are facing design challenges related to the continuous scaling down of minimum feature size according to Moore’s law. Moreover, the conventional computing architecture is no more an effectual way to fulfill modern applications demands, such as big data analysis, pattern recognition, and vector processing. Therefore, there is an exigent need to shift to new technologies, at both the architecture and the device levels. Recently, memristor devices and structures attracted attention for being promising candidates for this job. Memristor device adds a new dimension for designing novel circuits and systems. In addition, high-density memristor-based crossbar is widely considered to be the essential element for future memory and bio-inspired computing systems. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be addressed before the memristor genuinely replaces current memory and computing technologies. We believe that our contributions to the emerging technology help in pushing it to a next level and shorten the way for better futuristic computing systems.

Talk 3 - Invited talk: Energy-Efficient Interface Circuits for Low-Energy Sensor Nodes (Nov. 30, Morning)

Energy efficiency is a key requirement for wireless sensor nodes, biomedical implants, and wearable devices. The energy consumption of the sensor node needs to be minimized to avoid battery replacement, or even better, to enable the device to survive on energy harvested from the ambient. Capacitive sensors do not consume static power; thus, they are attractive from an energy efficiency perspective. In addition, they can be employed in a wide range of sensing applications, such as pressure, humidity, biological, and chemical sensing. However, the capacitive sensor readout circuit—i.e., the capacitance-to-digital converter (CDC)—can be the dominant source of energy consumption in the system. Thus, the development of energy-efficient CDC architectures is crucial to minimizing the energy consumption of capacitive sensor nodes. In the first part of this talk, we propose several energy-efficient CDC architectures for low-energy sensor nodes. In the second part, we study the matching properties of small integrated capacitors, which are an integral component of energy-efficient CDCs. Despite conventional wisdom, we experimentally illustrate that the mismatch of small capacitors can be directly measured, and we report experimental mismatch measurements for sub-femtofarad integrated capacitors. We also correct the common misconception that lateral capacitors match better than vertical capacitors, and we identify the conditions that make one implementation preferable.



Comments